Conflict Analysis and Resolution, BA

Contact Info

Conflict Analysis and Resolution Undergraduate Program

North East Module II

4400 University Drive, MS 2E5

Fairfax, VA 22030

Phone: 703-993-4165

Email: ugradcar@gmu.edu

The world is becoming increasingly connected and the ability to create and maintain cross-cultural connections is more important than ever. As the effects of violence and conflict are felt throughout the global community, we are seeing more and more opportunities for collaboration, problem solving, and peacebuilding in local communities and across international barriers. To prepare our students to make cross-cultural connections, Bachelor's of Arts in Conflict Analysis and Resolution students must demonstrate intermediate level proficiency in a foreign language.

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Conflict Analysis and Resolution pulls content and courses from across the social science disciplines. Courses include an emphasis on asking the right questions to analyze conflict effectively and designing real world interventions that will work. Research and theory are paired with hands on skill development, preparing students for careers across a spectrum of possibilities.

As the world is becoming increasingly connected, the ability to create and maintain cross-cultural connections is increasing in importance. As the global community feels the effects of violence and conflict, we see more opportunities for collaboration, problem-solving, and peacebuilding in local communities and across international barriers. To prepare our students to make cross-cultural connections, our BA students must demonstrate intermediate level proficiency in a foreign language.

Admitted students interested in declaring a B.A., B.S., or minor in Conflict Analysis and Resolution are welcome to visit the S-CAR Undergraduate Advising Office located in the Northeast Module II.

Students will also have the opportunity to speak with an advisor during freshman and transfer orientation sessions.

Have any questions or want to learn more about the program? Advisors can be reached for general inquiries at ugradcar@gmu.edu or 703-993-4165

Find degree requirements in the university catalog.

Program Requirements

All conflict analysis and resolution majors choose an area of concentration. There are six concentrations:

  • Building Peace in Divided Societies
  • Global Engagement
  • Political and Social Action
  • Justice and Reconciliation
  • Interpersonal Dynamics
  • Collaborative Leadership

Students must fulfill all requirements for bachelor's degrees as stated in Academic Policies including all Mason Core requirements.  Students majoring in Conflict Analysis and Resolution must also complete the college-level requirements for foreign language proficiency as well as 51 major requirement credits for the BA degree.

Students pursuing a double major/degree with a program outside of the S-CAR undergraduate program will be expected to fulfill all of the Mason Core and college requirements necessary to complete the second major. Please check with the second major department concerning additional requirements.

This undergraduate program offers students the option of applying to the accelerated master's degree program.  See Conflict Analysis and Resolution, BA or BS/Conflict Analysis and Resolution, Accelerated MS for specific requirements.

Writing-Intensive Requirement

All Mason students are required to complete at least one course designated as "writing intensive" in their major at the 300-level or above. CONF 302 has been designated "writing intensive."

Major Coursework Grade Requirement

Students cannot use more than 12 credits of coursework within the major with a C- or D grade to count towards the Conflict Analysis and Resolution, BA. If a student receives C- or D grades in excess of the allowed number, they may retake courses to meet the major coursework grade requirement for graduation. Students taking a graduate course for undergraduate credit must achieve a grade of B- or higher for graduate course credits to count towards their undergraduate degree.

Physical Education Courses

PHED, PRLS, and RECR courses offered by the School of Recreation, Health, and Tourism that are activity courses cannot be counted toward the 120 credits required for a degree in S-CAR. Students may use non-activity PHED, PRLS, and RECR courses for elective credit for S-CAR degrees.

Advising

School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution advisors help students create an interdisciplinary course of study that meets their interests and career goals. All majors are strongly encouraged to meet regularly with an academic advisor from the School who will help students develop and follow a coherent plan of study and complete the degree in a timely manner.

Degree Requirements Required core courses (27 credits)

Students can choose to fulfill this requirement through an internship, service learning, study abroad, or independent study.

Students may not be approved for field experience until they have earned at least 30 credits. It is recommended that students complete at least nine credits of conflict coursework before applying for field experience credit. Prior approval by the Director of Field Experience is required for students to receive credit through any field experience options. Students interested in trips with S-CAR can find information at scar.gmu.edu/field-experience. Students interested in study abroad through the Center for Global Education can find information at globaled.gmu.edu. Please contact an S-CAR advisor with questions or for information on the opportunities, policies, and procedures for field experience credit.  

Students take a minimum of three credits from the following:

This three credit requirement can be fulfilled by taking (1) an additional 3 credits of field experience selected from the courses above, (2) a foreign language course at the 250 level or higher, or (3) one of the 3 credit courses or three of the 1 credit courses listed below.

A combination of 3 different 1-credit skills courses

Courses may NOT double count for the concentration requirement and the skills and practice requirement.

Foreign Language Proficiency (0-12 credits)

Students must demonstrate intermediate-level proficiency in one foreign language. This requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing a course in a foreign language course numbered 202, 209, or 210 (or higher level courses taught in the language) or achieving a satisfactory score on a university approved foreign language proficiency test. Students who are already proficient in a second language may be eligible for a waiver of this requirement.

Concentration courses (18 credits)

There are six concentrations: Building Peace in Divided Societies, Global Engagement, Political and Social Action, Justice and Reconciliation, Interpersonal Dynamics, and Collaborative Leadership. To fulfill the concentration requirement students select six concentration courses. Four of those six courses must be taken from within their chosen concentration. The remaining two concentration courses may be taken from any of the concentration course lists. Special topics courses relevant to the concentration and/or courses that provide regional expertise can be substituted with departmental approval. Students are encouraged to check special topics courses each semester and think creatively about the applicability of courses that support learning in their chosen concentration. At least two of the six concentration courses must be CONF courses.  Courses may not double count for the concentration requirement and the skills and practice requirement.

Focuses on how divided societies with a history of conflict seek to transform relationships and situations of violence and injustice. Examines communities and societies that have experienced conflict and how individuals and groups build peace locally and globally.

Students choose at least four of their six concentration courses from the following:

Focuses on studying the dynamics and impact of global conflict resolution.  Examines domestic and international dimensions of security, state-to-state conflict, internal wars, terrorism, migration, negotiation, and diplomacy. Explores what can be done to reduce violent conflict and increase peace and security.

Students choose at least four of their six concentration courses from the following:

Focuses on the ways that people organize themselves to effect change in their societies. This concentration explores social action, social organization, social movements, and civil resistance to analyze and investigate the role of constructive conflict.

Students choose at least four of their six concentration courses from the following:

Focuses on the-relationships between human rights, justice, and conflict resolution. Encompasses a spectrum of coursework including legal dimensions of human rights, trauma, memory, healing, conflict transformation, and forms of restorative justice. 

Students choose four of their six concentration courses from the following:

Focuses on the dynamics of social interaction that lead to interpersonal conflict and the processes and skills that support the transformation of these conflicts. Issues examined include intercultural communication, psychology of groups, family relationships, and other dimensions of human relations.

Students choose four of their six concentration courses from the following:

Focuses on improving the capacity of leaders to work with conflict and manage change. Includes topics in conflict transformation, mediation, dialogue, and organizational leadership.

Students choose four of their six concentration courses from the following:

Students interested in creating their own concentration can work with an advisor to decide upon a set of at least six courses that form a cohesive theme and will fulfill the requirements of the BA in Conflict Analysis and Resolution. Individualized concentrations must be approved by the Director of the Undergraduate Program

Mason Core (40 credits)

Note: some Mason Core requirements may already be fulfilled by the major requirements listed above.  Students are strongly encouraged to consult their advisors to ensure they fulfill all remaining Mason Core requirements.

Expand each item below for a link to specific course lists for each category.

Foundation Requirements (15-19 credits)

  • Mason Core UWCU - Written Communication
  • Mason Core UOC - Oral Communication
  • Mason Core UQR - Quantitative Reasoning
  • Mason Core UITC - Information Technology

Core Requirements (22 credits)

  • Mason Core UFA - Arts
  • Mason Core UGU - Global Understanding
  • Mason Core ULIT - Literature
  • Mason Core UNSL - Natural Science
  • Mason Core USBS - Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • Mason Core UWC - Western Civilization/Western History Synthesis/Capstone Requirement (minimum 3 credits)
  • Mason Core USYN - Synthesis/Capstone

Foundation Requirements (15-19 credits)

  • Mason Core UWCU - Written Communication
  • Mason Core UOC - Oral Communication
  • Mason Core UQR - Quantitative Reasoning
  • Mason Core UITC - Information Technology

Remaining credits needed to bring the degree total to 120 may be fulfilled with general elective courses.  PHED and PRLS activity courses cannot be counted toward elective credits required for a degree in Conflict Analysis and Resolution.

Total: 120 credits

Opportunities

Learn from the Leaders of Conflict Resolution

Our 20+ full-time faculty work locally and globally with peace and conflict organizations on the day’s most pressing conflicts.
Our faculty regularly win grants to do important research in the field and are widely published, informing the study of Conflict Resolution in programs all over the world.
Faculty and students collaborate to explore local peacebuilding, justice, genocide prevention, the understanding of narrative, identity, race, and culture and their relation to conflict
More than 60 part-time and affiliated faculty bring professional expertise as practitioners who lead classes on topics on which they are passionate.

Gain Real World Experience

  • Develop in-demand job skills such as critical thinking, cross-cultural understanding, creative problem-solving, research and writing skills, interpersonal skills, and enhance your ability to work in teams.
  • Students apply their coursework to real-world experiences through internships, and our signature Peacebuilding Fellows Program.
  • Students participate in unique enrichment activities such as attending the International Day of Peace at the United Nations and a simulation for World Refugee Day at the U.S. State Department.
  • All of our graduates complete a field experience; 47 percent of the 2016 graduates completed more than one.
  • Faculty-run facilities such as the Center for Narrative and the Center for World Religions, Diplomacy, & Conflict Resolution offer students the opportunity to work and gain experience.
  • Students engage in conflict resolution practice through faculty-led trips to such nations as Colombia, Syria, Liberia, and Indonesia.

Career Options

Government and Security

  • Consolidated Analysis Centers, Intelligence and Research Analyst
  • Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Specialist
  • Department of Defense, Program Analyst
  • Department of Homeland Security, Human Resources Specialist

Law and Advocacy

  • Old Dominion Court Services, Pretrial Services Officer & Investigator
  • Northern Virginia Mediation Services, Court Mediator Coordinator
  • Department of Labor, Civil Rights Lawyer
  • House of Representatives, Legislative Correspondent

Peacebuilding and Development

  • American Red Cross, Program Officer
  • Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Managing Editor - Arab Reform Bulletin
  • UNICEF, Emergency Communication Specialist
  • United States Institute of Peace, Consultant

Education

  • American University, Assistant Director for New Student Programs
  • City Year Washington, DC, Senior Civic Engagement Manager
  • District of Columbia Public Schools, Director of Business Operations
  • Louis Gregory Regional Training Institute, After School Youth Program Coordinator

Business and Consulting

  • Cutting Edge C.A., Business Services Manager
  • Etik, Founder and President
  • Hologram Industries, Regional Marketing Communications Coordinator
  • USI Insurance Services, Vice President, Sales
This information is being provided here for your planning purposes only. For official catalog information, please refer instead to the official George Mason University Catalog Website at http://catalog.gmu.edu.